You first have to learn to hear overtones. With this program you can do that. Whoever learns it will change his entire listening experience. This is because completely new insights into the essence of sounds and realities are opened up.

Radio Feature by: Tanja Gronde. Broadcast from 09.05.2020 on BR Bayern 2 and BR Heimat.

More about the broadcast [BR Bayern2 and BR Heimat].

Obriu-me els llavis, Senyor

(2000, Oslo)

Recording: Latvian Radio Choir, Sigvards Klava, 2011.
5 choirs (17 voices):
4 mixed choirs (at least 32 singers, preferably 64)
with divisi and a male voice choir.

Obriu-me els llavis, Senyor is one of those a cappella works that I present in almost all of my lectures as a reference for completely new possibilities in choral music. It begins with a cluster that achieves an immense effect through its pure intonation alone, before a shimmering chorus of overtones rises from a dense chord of precise vocals as if it were not from this world. It is one of my favourite passages from one of my favourite CDs: Blanc. This CD is one of my most listened to and is an absolute recommendation. Latvian Radio Choir, conducted by Sigvards Klava, is one of the best in the world.

The fascinating thing about the overtones of the Latvian Radio Choir is that they maintain the lightness of the voice and the intonation of the fundamental notes without any obvious change in timbre when they change overtone technique. This is my sound ideal. The overtones seem almost unreal, one can hardly believe that the entire sound is sung exclusively a cappella. This skill unfolds the true magic of overtone singing. This is the future of professional overtone singing: the imperceptible, softly flowing transition from the classical voice to the world of overtones and back again.

Bernat Vivancos’ music is like a city of angels: blissful sounds populated by saintly spirits hiding between the notes as birds in a tree.
Lasse Thoresen

If you want to buy the CD, I recommend downloading it from the publisher’s website. There you can download a higher quality than the usual CD. And under the tab ”Scores” you will find a very special extra: free download of the sheet music.

Interview with the composer:

 

Minghao Xu’s 2009 film brings us close to the mystery of overtones, which seems to become the stranger the deeper you look into it. The film illuminates the phenomenon from the perspective of some of the greatest experts in the field of overtone singing, with some exciting and well-researched scientific and philosophical backgrounds. This documentary film portrays seven international musicians and tells the story of the director’s personal fascination with ‘overtone singing’ and the fractal geometry of sound. An amazing journey into a mysterious world of sound.

With

  • David Hykes
  • Wolfgang Saus
  • Christian Bollmann
  • Danny Wetzels
  • Hosoo & Transmongolia
  • Jill Purce
  • Mark van Tongeren

Director and producer: Minghao Xu
2009 Traumzeit publishing house, David Lindner

You can buy the DVD of the film with some extras in German/English here.

Minghao Xu about his film (quote from facebook):

My first production – a documentary about overtone singing – was published in 2010. Now after 10 years I am making it available for free on YouTube.

A big Thank You to Danny Wetzels who introduced me to overtone singing, who was and is a musical inspiration and a friend to me throughout the years.

Big Thank You to Wolfgang Saus who has a deep understanding of the human voice, who is brilliant in teaching how to hear and sing overtones and who supported me massively in creating this documentary.

Thank You to David Hykes who touched me as a singer as much as an inspirational being.

Thank You to Christian Bollmann, Hosoo Dangaa Khosbayar, Jill Purce and Mark van Tongeren – without your presence, knowledge, voice and contribution this project couldn’t have manifested. And Thank You to David Lindner for your help to publish this project through the Traumzeit Verlag.

 

I noticed this recording by the French artist Vicent Tournoud because it represents the transition from the Mongolian Khöömii technique (throat singing) to Western overtone singing.

It is apparent that the two styles will eventually mix. Mongolian singers adapt western music, currently mainly from the rock/pop direction, Western overtone singers integrate throat singing, currently with a preference for undertone singing. I have subscribed to his YouTube channel and am looking forward to his future creations.

Vincent Tournoud learned overtone singing at the age of 26 in West Mongolia in the centre of the Mongolian throat singing Chandman with Tserendavaa Dashdorj and Sengedorj Nanjid. He lives in Grenoble, France, where he teaches overtone singing.

More about the artist:

Website
YouTube
Facebook
Soundcloud

 

Note: The video does not work in some countries.

Achim Winter is going on another adventure and attends an overtone singing class with Wolfgang Saus. A cheerful German television team, Achim and his cameraman Hans-Jürgen Schmitz, meet on a Sunday morning in the former synagogue in Freudental for an equally cheerful weekend course group and film, participate and interview participants. As you can see, we had a lot of fun. The participants: Bettina Güßmann, Michael Volz, Diana Leo, Dorothea Niedecken, Ottschke Hemmerlein, Nicola Kaupert, Peter Schneider, Roland Wagner, Edwin Lengl, Achim Winter.

Impressions from the shooting

Links

⇒ZDF Website

Overtone vocals & classical guitar – Daniel Pircher
Didjeribone – Marc Miethe
Written by – Daniel Pircher
Camera – Vincent Dzikowski & René Gamsa
Video Editing – Daniel Pircher
Recording & Engineering – Marco Birkner at Studio H2 Berlin

I like Daniel Pircher’s wonderfully clear and light overtones.

 

“solo accordion piece developed through close collaboration with Goran Stevanovic. The vocal control is as crucial as the accordion playing. The sung notes and the sound as a result of overtone singing, as well as whispering, are important materials in this piece.”
Feliz Anne Reyes Macahis about lu:tαŋ [Translated by ws]

Since Karlheinz Stockhausen’s “Stimmung” (1968) overtone singing has had a place in serious music as “extended vocal technique”. The Philippine composer Feliz Anne Reyes Macahis, who lives in Austria, wrote this work for the accordionist Goran Stevanović. Goran Stevanović studied accordion in Bijeljina, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and at the Hochschule für Musik, Theater und Medien in Hannover. The award-winning musician currently lives and works in Hanover and is involved in contemporary music and music education.

https://www.felizmacahis.com/

http://goranstevanovic.com/

Ivana Rea’s beautiful alto, cello, overtone singing by Michal Pustay. Ivana Rea is a well-known singer from the Czech Republic. Ivana will be touring with her new album in 2019/2020. Go when there is a concert near you. By the way, Ivana also sang in the European Overtone Choir.

 

Premiere: 1990 Wellington (New Zealand)
Commitioned by Victoria University of Wellington
RD:NEW ALBION/NA-099

Sōmei Satō creates a multi-track overtone choir with his own voice and uses vowel overtone singing as an effect. I have heard something similar from Roberto Laneri’s “Two views of the Amazon” from 1981. At the beginning of the 1980s, this probably sounded more like electronic music to most listeners, as overtone singing was still virtually unknown in the West.

Premiere 1982. Tokyo.
Commitioned by Japan Foundation
RD:ALM/AL-26, NEW ALBION/NA-099, NA-016