“solo accordion piece developed through close collaboration with Goran Stevanovic. The vocal control is as crucial as the accordion playing. The sung notes and the sound as a result of overtone singing, as well as whispering, are important materials in this piece.”
Feliz Anne Reyes Macahis about lu:tαŋ [Translated by ws]

Since Karlheinz Stockhausen’s “Stimmung” (1968) overtone singing has had a place in serious music as “extended vocal technique”. The Philippine composer Feliz Anne Reyes Macahis, who lives in Austria, wrote this work for the accordionist Goran Stevanović. Goran Stevanović studied accordion in Bijeljina, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and at the Hochschule für Musik, Theater und Medien in Hannover. The award-winning musician currently lives and works in Hanover and is involved in contemporary music and music education.

https://www.felizmacahis.com/

http://goranstevanovic.com/

 

Premiere: 1990 Wellington (New Zealand)
Commitioned by Victoria University of Wellington
RD:NEW ALBION/NA-099

Sōmei Satō creates a multi-track overtone choir with his own voice and uses vowel overtone singing as an effect. I have heard something similar from Roberto Laneri’s “Two views of the Amazon” from 1981. At the beginning of the 1980s, this probably sounded more like electronic music to most listeners, as overtone singing was still virtually unknown in the West.

Premiere 1982. Tokyo.
Commitioned by Japan Foundation
RD:ALM/AL-26, NEW ALBION/NA-099, NA-016

One of the very early compositions for western overtone singing. At that time overtone singing was hardly known.

23′
World premiere Tokyo 1986.
RD:NEW ALBION/NA-016, NA-099

Recording of the first movement “Roncesvalles” from “Path of Miracles” by Joby Talbot. The choir Tenebrae sings under Nigel Short.

The English composer Joby Talbot wrote this work in 2005 on behalf of the ensemble Tenebrae under the direction of Nigel Short. It is set for 17-part mixed choir a cappella SSSSSAAAATTTTBBBB and Crotales.

This four-movement work describes a pilgrimage along four of the most important stations of the Way of St. James to Santiago: I Roncesvalles, II Burgos, III León, IV Santiago. The composer dedicated the composition to his father, who died in the year of composition. The premiere, which was scheduled for 07.07.2005 in London, had to be postponed due to the bombings on this day and took place on 17.07.2015 in the St. Bartholomew-the-Great Church in London.

The first movement begins the pilgrimage in Roncesvalles with a mystical sound ascending in glissandi, based on the Pasibutbut of the Bunun from Taiwan. The instruction to use different vowels other than /i/ is interpreted by the ensemble – similar to the Pasibutbut – as an overtone chanting. Already on the first four pages, the work demands an enormous range from A1 to C7.

CDs

(Affiliate links to amazon.de)

 

Sheet Music

Sheet music on amazon.de (affiliate link)

Sheet music at Chester Music Ltd

Related Links

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Path_of_Miracles#cite_note-Talbot_Path-9

Insight into sheet music. https://issuu.com/scoresondemand/docs/path_of_miracles_14740/4

http://www.tenebrae-choir.com/path-of-miracles

Joby Talbot wrote the soundtrack to some famous productions like ‘The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy’.
Movies with film scores by Joby Talbot (affiliate link to buch7.de).

A composition by Aaron Jensen, Canada 2012, for mixed choir a cappella and overtone soloist.

SSAATTB + overtone singer soloist (khoomej style) 6’00″

Text by Uvavnuk – translation: Jane Hirshfield

Commissioned by The Toronto Arts Council

Premiere: 12.05.2013 — The Elmer Iseler Singers, conductor Lydia Adams

Guest overtone singer: Scott Peterson

More about the composition on Aaron Jensen’s website.

In October 2014 the composer surprisingly sent me the link to this video. “Der Bootssteg” by Günther Beckers was my very first production with overtone singing in 1986. I hadn’t heard of it since then and, to be honest, I had even forgotten that I had already made music with overtones back then.

In 1983 I was on stage with Roberto Laneri for the project “Nada Brahma – Die Welt ist Klang” by Joachim Ernst Berendt. For the first time in my life I heard overtone singing and was deeply moved so that I immediately realized that overtones would change my life. I taught myself how to sing overtones with many experiments, without the slightest idea of how it worked, only from the memory of the sound, without the possibility to listen to recordings. And I couldn’t find out Roberto Laneri’s phone number. It’s amazing how contemporary the work still sounds today, then an experimental innovation.

→More about the composition

In the recording: Marie-Dagny Wennberg from Sweden – alto, Wolfgang Saus – baritone overtone singing, members of the Collegium Byzantinum Aix la Chapelle, studio mix by Miki Meuser, acoustic rooms of the Institute for High-Frequency Engineering at Aachen University. Digital artificial head recording (also new at that time).

1986 was a year of extraordinary music projects for me. After an intensive with a professional ensemble in a master class of the Swedish exceptional choir leader and later successor of Eric Ericsons, Anders Eby, it became even clearer to me that the secret of professional choral sound lies in the overtones.

I had just received a solo contract at the Municipal Theatre Aachen for the premiere of the opera “Chimäre” by the Munich composer Hans-Jürgen von Bose and rehearsed the difficult score including polyphonic tape recordings. At that time I loved avant-garde and experimental music and was able to easily sight read scores, so that I rehearsed new music with much joy.

At the same time, Günther Beckers, painter and composer, approached me with his composition “Der Bootssteg – Hallkammer und schalltoter Raum” (“The jetty – reverberation chamber and anechoic chamber”). It was my part for overtone singing. It was played as a media production on the occasion of an exhibition at the Venice Biennale. In 1984 I had already worked with Günther Beckers and performed “Anna – ein neuer Mensch” (video), a co-production of Günther Beckers with Miki Meuser (no overtone singing yet). I found the project so exciting, because it fit exactly to my question about the sound secret of choral music.

Back then I had no idea if you could make purposeful music with overtones at all. My overtone technique was still uncertain. There were no teachers or I knew nobody except Laneri. In 1986 I had not yet heard of Michael Vetter or David Hykes. That was a challenge, because I studied chemistry at the same time and sang in six choirs and had rehearsals every day. Young and unstoppable when it came to sound. Except “young” not much has changed ;).

I am happy that this rarity has now emerged.